Naked Man Stampede Festival Tour (Sat, 2nd Mar)
Naked Man Stampede Festival Tour (Sat, 2nd Mar)

Additional information

Naked Man Stampede Festival Tour (Sat, 2nd Mar)

¥11,900 (Adult) / ¥5,900 (Child: ~12 yrs)

Booked Out

Tour Date: Sat, 2nd Mar 2024
Destination: Urasa Bisyamondo Temple
Depart: Nozawa Onsen Chuo Bus Terminal
Minimum (Total number of a tour group): 6 Adults
Includes: Return Transfers and an English Speaking Guide
Cancellation/Amendment Fees:
– After the booking is confirmed: ¥500 per person
– 3 to 2 business days prior: 30% of the total price
– 1 business day prior: 50% of the total price
– Tour day: 100% of the total price

Time
Schedule
16:30
Depart from Nozawa Onsen
18:00
Arrive at Urasa Bishamondo Temple (Festival site)
Participating guests / Free time
(Food stalls available)
21:00
Depart from Urasa
22:30
Return to Nozawa Onsen
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Tour Description

Take the nudie run to new extremes! All in the name of tradition!

The Naked Man Stampede festival is a very rare chance for you to not only watch but also participate in an ancient tradition. Get into the rather immodest white garbs, don your straw sandals, and run with locals in the freezing cold to honour the Buddhist god of war and wealth!

Once a year, the hinged doors of Bishamoundou are opened for the Urasa Bishamondo Naked Jostling Festival. Held at the Bukoji-Temple, the festival grounds are lined with traditional food and gift stalls, and hosts an array of parades and events. After immersing yourself in some of Japan’s religious and cultural traditions, witness the main allure of the festival as groups of drunk half naked men (some carrying huge candles weighing up to 50kg) jostle one another to be the first to pay worship to Bishamon, the Buddhist God of war and wealth.